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The Sheridan Historical Society Museum, a storefront on Main Street that was left as a gift from the late industrialist Kenneth Biddle, is managed by volunteers who also keep family archives and log records of many events and social affairs in rural life.

It is open twice weekly, Tuesday and Friday, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Call to check hours or for special appointments:
(317) 758-5054.

Address: 308 S. Main St., Sheridan, IN 46069
E-mail: sheridanhistorical@sbcglobal.net



Maintaining Collections:
With new museum software, volunteers have been engaged in a long-term process to document museum collections and detail background information in computerized catalogs. Restoration has also prompted reframing of old photographs, identifying unique tools and kitchen items, and logging artifacts.

Archives:
Archives enchant visitors, especially children, who become intrigued about their family heritage. Every year, more than 100 fourth grader tour Boxley Cabin, the Sheridan Public Library and the Sheridan Historical Society museum. It is always heartening to see the students discover pieces of history and families ties. Genealogy collections contain more than 500 family histories and research; old copies of the "Sheridan News" are now on microfiche to help those looking for more detailed information.

Business and Industry:
Once the second largest industrial community in Hamilton County, Sheridan blossomed in the Gas Boom in the late 1800's and the Monon Railroad connected shipments of brick, glass and grain to destinations throughout the United States. A creamery employed hundreds, producing canned milk under the names of Indiana Condensed Milk, Wilson's Milk and Kraft Foods. Sorghum mills were popular but also faded. But American industry dramatically shifted...and times changed in Sheridan as urbanization moved Sheridan into the role of a bedroom community taking its workforce into other nearby cities and towns.